what does too twisted for color tv mean?

from steel magnolias, does this phrase have a definition?

I’d have to know the context, and it’s been a while since I’ve seen Steel Magnolias.

But I think it might have something to do with broadcast standards back in the day. Old kung fu movies were usually shot in color, but during a fight sequence they would deliberately change to black and white. This was because the censors thought blood was too violent, so by going into black and white the blood would be disguised–especially since it would blend with static from the antenna signal. Clearly they aren’t talking about kung fu movies in Steel Magnolias (although, if they did, I’d probably remember it better ) but I think that’s related to the origins of the phrase. If something was too shocking for color TV, they would change it to black and white.

Or something like that.

It actually means the pattern on the clothing. Back then there were certain patterns that didn t work on tv, as it either blended in or looked like it was moving. It caused a glare and looked bizarre. Like stripes or plaids. Horizontal lines. Paisleys. It was easier in black and white.

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Actually “that is just too much for color tv” implies the drama being referenced to can only be appreciated by seeing it in black and rather than color as B&W is much more suited for dramatic displays

“You are too twisted for color TV.” : ‘Your conduct is socially unacceptable. It might have passed on early black-and-white TV, but not anymore, now that color TV’s are in every living room.’

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