What is ironic in the words used by the narrator to describe the summoner in “the prologue” to the canterbury tales?

What is ironic in the words used by the narrator to describe the summoner in “the prologue” to the canterbury tales? you’d meet none better if you went to find one. / why, he’d allow—just for a quart of wine— / any good lad to keep a concubine. (ll. 666–668)

It could be said that these words used to describe the Summoner are ironic because he is presented as a drunk and that he only can speak Latin. What is more, he is described as a not very clean man so by using these lines the narrator is, in a way, making fun of the character as an opposition to what has been described .

He is presented as a drunk and that he only can speak Latin. Explanation: He is described as a not very clean man, so therefore by using these words the narrator is, in a way, making fun of the character as an opposition.

“He was a noble varlet and a kind one,/You’d meet none better if you went to find one.” Explanation: The Summoner in “The Canterbury Tales”  is one of the religious characters in the Tales. He is a hypocrite. The narrator describes his face “like a Cherubin” which means that he had a face that was bright red and full of pimples. He is a greedy Summoner who would take bribe from the people instead of bringing them before the church court. The irony that the narrator uses in the Prologue to describe the Summoner is that he is a noble and kind person and if we will try to find such a person we will find none because he is the only one.

Also Read :   This excerpt shows that unlike Zaroff, Rainsford has still retained his sense of

greedy man who uses fake relics and pardons to accumulate wealth for himself.

hi i help u it is u Explanation: becuz it is thanks tye

Answer 6

It means that these words help in describing the summoner in an ironic way. The summoner is presented as drunk and he is capable of speaking in Latin. The Summoner is asked to find someone so that he can find someone better in his life. Otherwise he will need to spend his time with a concubine for allowing the quarter of his life to be spent in the better manner.

Answer 7

The irony behind the words used by the narrator to describe the summoner in the prologue of “The Canterbury Tales” is: Inside the phrase: You’d meet none better if you went to find one. Because he was also a sinner, who would let anyone sin if they found a deal. Explanation: All right, so the irony in this scene is that the summoner was a man at the church’s service that would allow anyone to take a concubine if they provided wine to drink because he was also a sinner. A Man at the service of the church who had a drinking addiction, that would allow a man to go with his sin for help to keep his sin alive.

Also Read :   The term koinai ennoiai refers to .

The irony in these lines is that the narrator is describing the Summoner as an alcoholic person, which is not something the reader would expect to read about him.
There is irony in the phrase “You’d meet none better if you went to find one.”, given the fact that the Summoner is a dishonest person with no morals, besides he drinks excessively and could forgive anyone to act badly only to gain some wine.

Can you post a picture of the assessment?

Did you get the answer to this?

Leave a Comment