What Does Damask’d mean?

Listen. This Is Sonnet 130 By Willia Shakespeare:

damask is a figured fabric of silk, wool, linen, cotton, or synthetic fibers, with a pattern formed by weaving. The roses must be wrapped in this cloth

Damask Definition

Damasked

Damask, or Damascus (after the place) are a type of rose. You can see a picture here: oldheirloomroses.com/Damask.htm
Damask is also a kind of fabric that is made by weaving really intricate and pretty floral patterns. It is usually silk, I think.
I’m not really sure which got called that first, but I for sure know that the roses are named after Damascus, so maybe they were?
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Good luck!

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RE:
What Does Damask’d mean?
Listen. This Is Sonnet 130 By Willia Shakespeare:
“I have seen roses damask’d, red and white”
Anyone care to shed some light?

Answer 6

The usual definition for Damask is:
A firm lustrous fabric (as of linen, cotton, silk, or rayon) made with flat patterns in a satin weave on a plain-woven ground on jacquard looms.
A patterned textile…etc., etc., etc..
…but that’s not what William is talking about…he’s refering to the other definition of Damask: a common name for R. damascena, a large, hardy rose that grows up to 8 feet, with fragrant double pink to red flowers. A red and white variety, Versicolor, is the York and Lancaster rose. A deep pink (not quite red) and white hybrid rose. Related to gallicas but larger and taller, damasks are the most fragrant of the old garden roses. Grown in the Middle East since Roman times for perfume – rose oil and attar of roses. Semi-double or double blooms. ‘Autumn Damask’ is the only repeat bloomer.

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Source(s): Editor, New Poets Press and Peninsular rose club

Answer 7

Here’s what Websters have on ‘damask’.
Main Entry: 1dam·ask
Pronunciation: ˈda-məsk
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English damaske, from Medieval Latin damascus, from Damascus
Date: 14th century
1: a firm lustrous fabric (as of linen, cotton, silk, or rayon) made with flat patterns in a satin weave on a plain-woven ground on jacquard looms
2: damascus steel ; also : the characteristic markings of this steel
3: a grayish red
In my own version of English, the word damask referrs to the use of rose petals of a deep red kind which are cut and made flat and glued to a surface such as a book binding to give it a high quality finish. To make an item appear to be covered with a satinate material.
Damask rose petals were used in Victorian times to wrap around the end’s of high quality hand-made cigarettes – a tip to stop the paper sticking to the upper or lower lip of the cigarette smoker.
Damask roses – images from Google.
http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&q=damask+r…

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Damask is a type of rich fabric, Shakespeare sees the roses as being clothed or dressed in this fine cloth.

my guess would be he’s seen a different side of roses if nobody else doesn’t know it probably could’ve help to had put a little more or not someone will know lol …good luck silly head =p

I believe it means interwoven or blended, usually a term used with fabric.
confirm this with another source, however, and let me know how that works out

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