How many absorptions would you expect to observe in the 13C NMR spectra of the following molecules?

How many absorptions would you expect to observe in the 13C NMR spectra of the following molecules?

When discussing 13C NMR spectra, it is important to consider how many molecules and atoms are present in the molecules being considered. The number of molecules will dictate the number of peaks that appear in the spectra, while the number of atoms will dictate the number of absorptions that are observed. In general, each covalently bonded carbon will give rise to one peak in the spectra, and each carbon atom will exhibit one absorption. Therefore, in the molecules listed below, we would expect to observe 3 absorptions in molecule A, 2 absorptions in molecule B, and 1 absorption in molecule C.

In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the number of absorptions corresponds to the number of molecules in the sample. The more molecules there are, the more likely it is that their nuclei will absorb the incident radiation. In general, molecules with more atoms are more likely to absorb radiation than molecules with fewer atoms. However, this is not always the case. For example, molecules with delocalized electron clouds are less likely to absorb radiation than molecules with localized electron clouds. As a result, the number of absorptions observed in an NMR spectrum can vary widely depending on the molecules in the sample.

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